When being “one of the guys” won’t cut it

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So often, women find themselves at workplaces in which they are a token, the “only one” who holds a certain identity. Black women, indigenous women, other women of color, disabled women, trans women, queer women, and those holding various marginalized identities-so many people experience this alienation in their workplace. This lack of visibility and community, and the implicit demand to assimilate in order to be accepted, is hugely draining and isolating.

This truth is deeply rooted in our country’s history. Since the founding of the United States, there have been legal, social, and economic systems in place that value the lives of white property-owning men over everyone else. From slavery to Black Codes, from redlining to ongoing differential enforcement of the law, Black Americans have been forcibly exploited and excluded from gaining generational wealth and power. Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans have experienced countless attacks on their communities, rights, and ability to achieve economic security during the history of the nation, a history that cannot be simply glossed over and forgotten. And it was only in 2020 that the Supreme Court ruled that it is illegal to fire a worker for being gay or transgender. …


Active listening is a sign of respect

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“What did you say? I heard you, but I wasn’t listening.”

You’ve probably had this said to you. The person you’re speaking to at work is distracted, either thinking about something else or actually doing something else when you’re talking. Whatever their excuse, not being listened to is insulting. And if it occurs frequently, as sometimes happens in the workplace, it can erode employee engagement and productivity.

Good listening skills, then, are important to develop and to use. They can affect your career: Active listening can make you a better leader and manager. …


Career and life coaches share how to deal with this slog of a year

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A global study by CARE International found that 55 percent of women reported COVID-related income loss and 27 percent of women reported rising anxiety, stress, and mental health issues.

Amid a pivotal election, a global pandemic, and an economic crisis, it’s normal to feel aimless. Our lives have changed, no matter how minor or major, and unfortunately we can’t predict what’s going to happen next week, next month, or next year. …


The only way to win with a toxic person is not to play

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Are your difficult coworkers or bosses just controlling and self-important blowhards? Or are they something much worse?

Could your colleague be a narcissist?

If you work with someone who has an inflated sense of their own importance and distinct lack of empathy for others, you may be rubbing elbows with a narcissist. Be careful: Whether clinically diagnosed with the personality disorder or not, these arrogant and overbearing colleagues can have an intense psychological impact on those around them and make life miserable.

So what are the signs to look for that you’re working for or with a narcissist? And what can you do about it? Is there any way to successfully handle that person in a professional manner so you can keep the job you love? …


I welcome your opinion! Eventually

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In early October, the vice presidential debate between Mike Pence and Kamala Harris showcased a gratingly familiar interpersonal dynamic-one individual interrupting another to dominate the discussion. It’s likely no surprise that women frequently experience this annoying issue. A Georgetown University study found that men interrupt 33 percent more when speaking with women.

People interrupt others for a lot of reasons, including impatience, cultural differences, and just plain old aggressiveness. Don’t take it personally, and don’t feel powerless. There are a lot of ways to help train a team member to play well with others.

Read more: What to Say to a Mansplainer in the…


Get out of the disengagement rut

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A Udemy survey found that more than 40 percent of American office workers are bored at work. According to that same survey, entry-level and mid-level workers are more likely to be bored at work than are their more senior colleagues, women are more likely to be bored at work than men are, and millennials are more likely to be bored at work than their baby boomers peers are.

Boredom at work can be a product of the natural cycles of business (i.e., busy seasons vs. slow seasons) or the nature of the work being monotonous, or it could be more about you as a professional: You might be overqualified for your job or your skills underutilized. …


6 things to consider before you apply

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For many of us, the first 20-plus years of our lives are dominated by study. We spend so much time in school preparing for our professional lives, and it becomes easy to think that another course, certification, or degree will be the thing to propel a career forward. It’s important to zoom out from the idea that education is always the answer when deciding if a grad degree is the right move for you. …


“Taking pride in what I do involves standing up for myself”

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Do you feel that if you truly love what you do, you’ll never work a day in your life? Is your job your passion? Is it hard to set work-life boundaries because you care so much about your career? Does your company call your team a “family”?

That’s how a lot of professionals aim to feel nowadays. People with high-status jobs like brand manager or curator, and even more and more low-wage workers in hospitality and retail, seek roles they’re deeply passionate about. …


Key strategies to use to expedite the process

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What’s your elevator pitch?

We are Dana Hundley and Jenna Richardson, the cofounders of Career Cooperative, an Oakland, California-based boutique consulting firm that empowers clients to face career transitions, professional growth, and recruiting with confidence through 1:1 career coaching, resume and toolkit writing, and community programming. We consult with companies to attract diverse talent through impactful recruiting and interview strategies and support employees through career development. We started working together at a recruiting agency, and through our combined 15-plus years in full-cycle recruiting and career development, we’ve worked with hundreds of candidates and companies and learned a lot in the process. …


Quiz your subconscious — consciously

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Discussion surrounding implicit association tests (IATs) has become increasingly popular as employers have begun to examine company-wide diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives. IATs are assessments used to measure associations between concepts; in the workplace, they help to unveil hidden biases regarding gender, race, age, and ability. With 42 percent of women experiencing gender biases at work, uncovering such biases is an important step in addressing the subtle discrimination and microaggressions that keep women and other marginalized groups from advancing in their organizations.

Before we dive in any further, let’s make one thing clear: The validity of IATs is contested by some researchers and practitioners. For example, in their 2013 meta-analysis of IATs, Oswald, Mitchell, and colleagues found that IATs were bad predictors of prejudice and discrimination. However, in other cases, IATs have exposed distinct relationships between hidden beliefs and behaviors. In 2011, Agerstrom and Rooth identified a clear connection between obesity IAT results of hiring managers and job interview decisions. Hiring managers who held negative ideas about individuals who were overweight were less likely to invite those candidates to interview. …

About

InHerSight

At InHerSight, our mission is to improve the workplace for women by measuring it.

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